We’re Having a Corn Roast!

There’s nothing better than locally grown Ontario corn, brought from the field straight to the corn cooker! This Friday, August 30th, you’re invited to the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market, from 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. for an old-fashioned corn roast.
This roast is not only a fundraiser for our market, but a great opportunity to check out the fresh local produce from all of our wonderful local farmers and vendors, as the sun sets on the summer, and the harvest gets into full swing.
We’ll also be offering live music this week too, as we welcome Fiddlers, Beth and Norris Johns who will entertain visitors at the market with their lively Celtic tunes and engaging sounds.

This is the last week the Haliburton Farmers Market will be in our Carnarvon location this season. Next week, September 7th, don’t forget we’ll be located in the Town of Haliburton at Rotary Beach Park, from 2pm – 6 pm. We hope to see you there!

To learn more about Corn, don’t forget to visit our ‘Weekly Events’ page!

It’s Corn Season at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market!

Corn is a vegetable and each kernel of corn is a seed. Kernels grow on cobs in cylindrical rows. There are a lot of seeds in each ear too as typically, each ear of sweet corn holds 800 kernels, situated in approximately 15 rows.

Sweet corn was the result of a gene mutation in field corn. This mutation occurred in the 1800s when sugar was prevented from entering the kernel and being converted into starch.

When shopping for corn, etiquette should be observed! One faux pas is pulling back husks if you don’t intend to buy the ear. Look instead for signs of freshness – A light pale green stem with silks & ends just beginning to turn brown. Etiquette aside, the husk protects the kernels, keeping them fresh and moist as corn starts losing sweetness as soon as it’s picked.

So, come out to the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market this Friday, August 24th as we celebrate this vegetable that has been cultivated for a millennia. Visit our ‘Weekly Events’ page for more insight into corn, and some fantastic recipes, too!

To learn more about corn, especially about its rich history, please visit these links:
Native American History of Corn
All about maize
The First People’s Corn
Three Sisters Garden
How and Why to Avoid GMO Corn

You Say Tomato, I Say Tom’ah’to

Almost everyone agrees that fresh tomatoes taste so much better than those bought at the grocery store.
When growing tomatoes isn’t an option, the next best thing is a visit to your local farmers’ market, or more specifically, the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market!

Local tomatoes are good for you! Locally grown tomatoes are in most cases bred for taste & nutritional value, unlike supermarket varieties that are bred for travel. Typically, grocery store tomatoes travel 500-2000 km’s. This means durability becomes the priority and flavour as well as nutrient value end up taking a back seat.

Tomato Tip
Don’t put those tomatoes in the refrigerator. That will ruin their flavour!
Tomatoes will store at room temperature for about a week.

Create some sauces, purees and salsa with your tomatoes and put them in the freezer.
It’s such a great way to enjoy them all year round!
Cheesy Baked Tomato
Provencal Tomatoes
Creamy tomato soup, Panera style
Check out our ‘Weekly Events‘ page for more about the Tomato, and for some more recipes, too!

So, whether you say ‘tomato’ or ‘tom(ah)to, the botanical name is Lycopersicon esculentum, and really, what’s in a name? We should just keep on experimenting and enjoying this popular, versatile food that just tastes so darned good no matter how you say it!
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And, not only do we celebrate tomatoes on Friday, but we also welcome local artisan Karly Cox of Ironclad Metal Works. Her studio is located on Kushog Lake Road, not far from the market. We also have 2 jewelers and a soap/candle maker, so why not join us at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market this Friday, August 17th where we celebrate the one and only tomato and our local artisans!
We hope to see you there!

Mad For Mushrooms

This week at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market, we’ll be Focusing on Mushrooms!

We’re in for an exciting market for this weeks August 10th market!
Not only do we have a mushroom vendor to introduce, Waymac Farms of Lakefield Ontario,.. ***An Update for everyone – Unfortunately our Mushroom vendor could not make it for today’s market. For this weeks ‘focus on mushrooms’ we’re happy to have a representative from the Haliburton Forest & Wildlife Reserve visiting. They will be offering information on how to grow your own shiitake mushrooms!

***An Update for everyone – Unfortunately our Mushroom vendor could not make it for today’s market.

Incidently, shiitake mushrooms have been cultivated in both Japan and China for more than 2,000 years.
When fresh, the shiitake offers a rich buttery, and even meaty flavour. When dried, the shiitake offers a smoky rich flavour. The texture not only tastes different from other mushrooms but it also contains a lower water content which accounts for the dense quality and concentrated aroma and flavour. Dried shiitakes are not only affordable but a great addition to many varied recipes. Shiitakes are an obvious choice for Asian cuisine or stir-fries.

More About Mushrooms
Hobby Farms link to: Mushroom Farming
Farmers Market Online: How to grow mushrooms
Cooking @ Love To Know: Types of edible mushrooms
Mushrooms.ca (PDF) – Mushroom production in Canada

Be sure to join us tomorrow at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market, especially if you’re mad for mushrooms like we are!