Leek Moth Project Demonstration

Garlic growers in Haliburton gathered earlier in the year to monitor the lifecycle of the leek moth to estimate just how abundant it is in the County.

Project partners and “citizen scientist’s” introduce themselvesThis ongoing project involving local farmers’ associations and U-Links, have been key participants and informants throughout the data collection process, and will ensure that the solutions developed are practical and effective.

 
Project partners and “citizen scientist’s” introduce themselves

Join us at the markets this week in the Village of Haliburton, (Tues. July 30, 12 pm – 4 pm), and at the Carnarvon market,  (Fri. Aug. 2nd, 1 pm to 5 pm), where Emma Horrigan, Researcher for U-Links, and Research Coordinator, Faculty of Forestry, U of Toronto shares her vast knowledge on the leek moth, and how it could affect the growth of garlic, alliums, and other members of the Allium family.

About the Leek Moth Project – Outline and Objectives

The main objective of this project is to quantify the impact and distribution of the leek moth (Acrolepiopsis assectella) in Haliburton  County, and develop evidence-based strategies for Allium growers that help them respond to and address these challenges.

Pheromone trap for the leek moth (Acrolepiopsis assectella) alongside rain gauge.

Pheromone trap for the leek moth (Acrolepiopsis assectella) alongside rain gauge.

The leek moth (A. assectella) is an invasive, alien species in eastern Canada that is well-recognized as a pest of concern for Allium production. The moth largely targets leeks but can also attack onion, shallot, garlic and chive (Jenner et al. 2010). Acrolepiopsis assectella was first recorded in the Ottawa area in 1993, and by 2010 had expanded into eastern Ontario, southwestern Québec, Prince Edward Island, and New  York (Mason et al. 2011). The impact of leek moths can be extensive, causing severe loss of vegetable and seed products (Jenner et al. 2010). Acrolepiopsis assectella may also pose potential threats to Allium biodiversity across North America (Allison et al. 2007); including the native wild leek (Allium tricoccum).

 This project has been funded by the Agricultural Adaptation Council (AAC).

All the above information and photos was supplied, with our thanks, by: Emma Horrigan

Researcher, U-Links Centre for Community-Based Research

Research Coordinator, Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto

93 Bobcaygeon Road, PO Box 655, Minden, ON K0M 2K0

Office: 705-286-2411 – Cell: 705-457-0144 – Website: www.ulinks.ca

 

 

 

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