Calling all vegetable gardeners in #MyHaliburtonHighlands! We’re having a contest!

Calling all vegetable gardeners!

Bok Choi odd veggie contest HCFM 2014 - Karen SloanWe’re having an ‘Oddest Looking Vegetable Contest’ at the market! Bring your oddest/funniest/silliest looking vegetables to the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market tent, (at either market location), on or before July 29th.

Judging will take place at the Head Lake market location in the Village of Haliburton on Tuesday, July 29th

Prizes to be announced soon!  (Fresh vegetables only please!)

 

2013 Haliburton County Farmers’ Market Vendor Application

The Haliburton County Farmers’ Market is seeking vendors and new products/services that fit in the market’s model.

We’re seeking vendors who provide local fruits and vegetables, meat, as well as produce from home gardeners too!

The market is a one-stop shopping experience offering quality local & regional foods, other agricultural products, as well work from a few local Haliburton artisans offering one-of-a-kind items.

Haliburton County Farmers' Market Vendors – Market Vendor Application

Market Rules & Regulations

Interested in becoming a vendor at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market? Please review the Market Rules, then download and submit a Vendor Application from links provided.

Completed and signed vendor applications are due by March 15th, 2013

Please mail to: Elaine Repath, Market Manager, 2344 Duck Lake Rd., Minden, ON K0M 2K0

Questions?! Please contact:

Angel Taylor: 705-286-4877  ~(or)~ Elaine Repath, Market Manager: 705.457.0991

Email: incredibleHCFMA [at] gmail [dot] com

It’s Corn Season at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market!

Corn is a vegetable and each kernel of corn is a seed. Kernels grow on cobs in cylindrical rows. There are a lot of seeds in each ear too as typically, each ear of sweet corn holds 800 kernels, situated in approximately 15 rows.

Sweet corn was the result of a gene mutation in field corn. This mutation occurred in the 1800s when sugar was prevented from entering the kernel and being converted into starch.

When shopping for corn, etiquette should be observed! One faux pas is pulling back husks if you don’t intend to buy the ear. Look instead for signs of freshness – A light pale green stem with silks & ends just beginning to turn brown. Etiquette aside, the husk protects the kernels, keeping them fresh and moist as corn starts losing sweetness as soon as it’s picked.

So, come out to the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market this Friday, August 24th as we celebrate this vegetable that has been cultivated for a millennia. Visit our ‘Weekly Events’ page for more insight into corn, and some fantastic recipes, too!

To learn more about corn, especially about its rich history, please visit these links:
Native American History of Corn
All about maize
The First People’s Corn
Three Sisters Garden
How and Why to Avoid GMO Corn