2013 Haliburton County Farmers’ Market Vendor Application

The Haliburton County Farmers’ Market is seeking vendors and new products/services that fit in the market’s model.

We’re seeking vendors who provide local fruits and vegetables, meat, as well as produce from home gardeners too!

The market is a one-stop shopping experience offering quality local & regional foods, other agricultural products, as well work from a few local Haliburton artisans offering one-of-a-kind items.

Haliburton County Farmers' Market Vendors – Market Vendor Application

Market Rules & Regulations

Interested in becoming a vendor at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market? Please review the Market Rules, then download and submit a Vendor Application from links provided.

Completed and signed vendor applications are due by March 15th, 2013

Please mail to: Elaine Repath, Market Manager, 2344 Duck Lake Rd., Minden, ON K0M 2K0

Questions?! Please contact:

Angel Taylor: 705-286-4877  ~(or)~ Elaine Repath, Market Manager: 705.457.0991

Email: incredibleHCFMA [at] gmail [dot] com

Cranberries at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market

This week’s Haliburton County Farmers’ Market focuses on the wonderful qualities, characteristics and taste of the mighty cranberry.

The Oxford English Dictionary indicates that the early New England colonists may have coined the word cranberry from the German “kranebere” – literally, “crane berry.” Some say this is because the flower was considered to like a crane, while others think it’s because cranes were seen to feed on the plant.

The first known use of the word “cranberries” in English occurred in a letter written by the missionary John Eliot in 1647. (Source: Cranberry Harvest: A History of Cranberry Growing in Massachusetts. Joseph D. Thomas, ed. New Bedford, Mass.: Spinner Publications, 1990.)

The cranberry is a Native American wetland fruit which grows on trailing vines like a strawberry. The vines thrive on the special combination of soils and water properties found in wetlands. Wetlands are nature’s sponges; they store and purify water and help to maintain the water table. Cranberries grow in beds layered with sand, peat and gravel. These beds are commonly known as bogs or marshes and were originally formed as a result of glacial deposits.

Cranberries, for the most part, are grown through the northern part of the United States. The major production areas are New Jersey, Massachusetts, Oregon, Washington, Wisconsin and the Canadian provinces of British Columbia and Quebec. Other regions grow cranberries as well, to varying extent, and these include Delaware, Maine, Michigan, New York, Rhode Island, as well as the provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Ontario.

To learn more about cranberries, please visit our ‘Weekly Events Guide” and these other very informative links:
Global Gourmet
Cranberries at Wikipedia
– Cranberry Recipes at Canadian Living

You Say Tomato, I Say Tom’ah’to

Almost everyone agrees that fresh tomatoes taste so much better than those bought at the grocery store.
When growing tomatoes isn’t an option, the next best thing is a visit to your local farmers’ market, or more specifically, the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market!

Local tomatoes are good for you! Locally grown tomatoes are in most cases bred for taste & nutritional value, unlike supermarket varieties that are bred for travel. Typically, grocery store tomatoes travel 500-2000 km’s. This means durability becomes the priority and flavour as well as nutrient value end up taking a back seat.

Tomato Tip
Don’t put those tomatoes in the refrigerator. That will ruin their flavour!
Tomatoes will store at room temperature for about a week.

Create some sauces, purees and salsa with your tomatoes and put them in the freezer.
It’s such a great way to enjoy them all year round!
Cheesy Baked Tomato
Provencal Tomatoes
Creamy tomato soup, Panera style
Check out our ‘Weekly Events‘ page for more about the Tomato, and for some more recipes, too!

So, whether you say ‘tomato’ or ‘tom(ah)to, the botanical name is Lycopersicon esculentum, and really, what’s in a name? We should just keep on experimenting and enjoying this popular, versatile food that just tastes so darned good no matter how you say it!
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And, not only do we celebrate tomatoes on Friday, but we also welcome local artisan Karly Cox of Ironclad Metal Works. Her studio is located on Kushog Lake Road, not far from the market. We also have 2 jewelers and a soap/candle maker, so why not join us at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market this Friday, August 17th where we celebrate the one and only tomato and our local artisans!
We hope to see you there!

Strawberry Season!


There are so many reasons to enjoy locally grown food in the Haliburton Highlands,
especially this time of year! Now is the time to take advantage of fresh berries,
especially fresh strawberries! That’s right, strawberry season has arrived at the
Haliburton Farmers’ Market and we will be celebrating this wonderful, luscious and
versatile fruit this coming Friday, June 29th. This week’s theme will be:
Sweet on You – Berries, Honey, Maple Syrup & Other Goodies“.
That includes strawberries, of course!

Take advantage of fresh, locally grown strawberries while they are available! Generally, the season stretches from mid-June to mid-July, but other ever-bearing fruit will be available from our vendors at the market throughout the summer and even into early fall. For Strawberry information and recipes, please visit our “Weekly Events” page.

For more information, please call our Market Manager, Elaine Repath at: 705-457-0991
We’ll look forward to seeing you at the market.
– Thank you!