A hearty end of season thank you from the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market

This coming Friday, October 11th marks the last date for the Haliburton County Farmer’s Market, where all of our wonderful vendors will be closing their tent flaps for 2013. It’s been another ‘incrEdible’ market season, and you can count on us being back when the seedlings sprout anew and another growing season is once again upon us. Look for us next year in both the Village of Haliburton and in Carnarvon. Check our website, ‘like’ our Facebook page, and follow our Twitter site for recipes, information, as well as updates about the 2014 season.

Friday is the last chance visitors will have to stock-up on Thanksgiving goodies from the market, (including cranberries!), so consider joining us in Carnarvon, between 1 and 5 p.m. where we’re proud to offer a Kimchee demonstration, presented by Carolyn Langdon.

Fall-LeavesOn behalf of the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market Board members and both market managers, I’d like to take this opportunity to thank everyone very much for their support, encouragement and patronage this year. Not only was the Carnarvon Market once again an unequivocal success, 5 years and counting, but the market in the Village of Haliburton more than surpassed all of our expectations, and we’re looking forward to doing it all over again next year!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Advertisements

Cranberries at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market

This week’s Haliburton County Farmers’ Market focuses on the wonderful qualities, characteristics and taste of the mighty cranberry.

The Oxford English Dictionary indicates that the early New England colonists may have coined the word cranberry from the German “kranebere” – literally, “crane berry.” Some say this is because the flower was considered to like a crane, while others think it’s because cranes were seen to feed on the plant.

The first known use of the word “cranberries” in English occurred in a letter written by the missionary John Eliot in 1647. (Source: Cranberry Harvest: A History of Cranberry Growing in Massachusetts. Joseph D. Thomas, ed. New Bedford, Mass.: Spinner Publications, 1990.)

The cranberry is a Native American wetland fruit which grows on trailing vines like a strawberry. The vines thrive on the special combination of soils and water properties found in wetlands. Wetlands are nature’s sponges; they store and purify water and help to maintain the water table. Cranberries grow in beds layered with sand, peat and gravel. These beds are commonly known as bogs or marshes and were originally formed as a result of glacial deposits.

Cranberries, for the most part, are grown through the northern part of the United States. The major production areas are New Jersey, Massachusetts, Oregon, Washington, Wisconsin and the Canadian provinces of British Columbia and Quebec. Other regions grow cranberries as well, to varying extent, and these include Delaware, Maine, Michigan, New York, Rhode Island, as well as the provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Ontario.

To learn more about cranberries, please visit our ‘Weekly Events Guide” and these other very informative links:
Global Gourmet
Cranberries at Wikipedia
– Cranberry Recipes at Canadian Living