The Haliburton County Farmers’ Market is seeking local & regional agricultural vendors!

HCFMA logo book exchange

 

An FYI from the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market to interested farmers and growers.

We are currently and actively seeking agricultural vendors near the  Haliburton Highlands for both of our market locations!

Agricultural products consist of items such as fruits & vegetables, minimally processed meats, maple syrup, etc.

Interested parties should contact the market manager, Gailon Valleau at: –  Tel: 705-306-0523

Email: incredibleHCFMA@gmail.com (or) Snail Mail:  Box 846, Minden ON, K0M 2K0

Our vendor applications can be found at this LINK  –  Thank you, and we look forward to hearing from you!

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

2013 Haliburton County Farmers’ Market Vendor Application

The Haliburton County Farmers’ Market is seeking vendors and new products/services that fit in the market’s model.

We’re seeking vendors who provide local fruits and vegetables, meat, as well as produce from home gardeners too!

The market is a one-stop shopping experience offering quality local & regional foods, other agricultural products, as well work from a few local Haliburton artisans offering one-of-a-kind items.

Haliburton County Farmers' Market Vendors – Market Vendor Application

Market Rules & Regulations

Interested in becoming a vendor at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market? Please review the Market Rules, then download and submit a Vendor Application from links provided.

Completed and signed vendor applications are due by March 15th, 2013

Please mail to: Elaine Repath, Market Manager, 2344 Duck Lake Rd., Minden, ON K0M 2K0

Questions?! Please contact:

Angel Taylor: 705-286-4877  ~(or)~ Elaine Repath, Market Manager: 705.457.0991

Email: incredibleHCFMA [at] gmail [dot] com

Learn to Save Seeds – Join Us at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market

When plants are allowed to reproduce naturally, they develop the ability to adapt to their local conditions which means they’re a reliable crop to grow year after year. Unfortunately, corporate agriculture relies on hybridized, and in many cases, genetically modified, or gmo plants.

This type of monoculture is bred for traveling long distances and not for their taste, and even worse, what they produce are more than likely swathed in poisonous chemicals.

A growing number of informed consumers are realizing that this negates the natural evolutionary process and is depleting the world’s biodiversity.
Thousands of vegetable and flower varieties have already been lost, some say as much as 80%, due to this reliance on commercial hybrid seeds that are eroding the gene pool, resulting in less hardy, more vulnerable plants.

We’ve all heard about the potato famine in Ireland. We should learn from this historical mistake they made of only growing one type of crop and be very careful to make sure history doesn’t repeat itself in the present time or the future.

If you raise and save your seeds, you are producing seed from and for your garden. By personal and careful selection anyone can produce plants best suited to their climate and gardening conditions.
By growing heirloom vegetables, ones that are adaptable to local conditions, the benefits are many. Many characteristics include better flavour, no chemicals, and they become pest and disease resistance, and many can be enhanced by careful selection over a period of years.

Seeds saved from open pollinated plants are the only kind that will produce again true to type. This means they will reproduce exactly the same as their parent plant the following year. Some do require space between one another, melons are a good example of this because they can be cross pollinated if two similar varieties are planted too close together, meaning next year, those seeds may turn into something completely different than what one expected!

Tomatoes are the exception. If you avoid hybrid varieties you’ll be able to grow the same tomato from seed saved from each plant next year, even if different varieties were grown close together.

Pepper and eggplant flowers can be cross-pollinated by insects, so different varieties of these have to be separated in the garden by about 500-feet to retain the purity of those seeds.

Saving tomato seeds take a little more time. Harvest nicely ripe tomatoes from several different vines of the same variety, cut each across the middle and gently squeeze the juice and seeds into a bowl. You will note that each tomato seed is encased in a gelatinous coating. (this prevents the seed from sprouting inside the tomato.) Remove this coating by fermenting it. This mimics the natural rotting of the fruit and has the added bonus of killing seed borne tomato disease.

Join us at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market this week as we learn all about saving seeds.
We’re thrilled to have Kaarina Blackie at the market. She’ll be demonstrating how to save seeds from heirloom vegetables, discussing the difference between heirloom and hybrid, and encouraging the use of heirloom seeds in your garden!

Kaarina’s focus is mainly on heirloom tomatoes. This year she grew 54 different varieties! Much of her demo focuses on tomato seeds but she’ll discuss many other varieties as well. She will also have some seeds on hand that are already fermenting and will explain the best drying and storage methods to maintain the good health and viability of the seeds.

Look for Kaarina to share info about the many other easy vegetable varieties to propagate such as: squashes, zucchinis, cucumbers, melons, watermelons, peppers, beans, lettuces, rapini, amaranth and radishes.
Kaarina will offer some free heirloom tomato seeds to those who are interested, as well as the many books and photographs she had to help people decide which tomatoes they would like to grow.
Come early and learn the basics of seed saving, and why it’s a beneficial gardening activity on so many levels.

For more information, consider a visit to these links:
Seeds of Diversity (Canada)
Vegetable Seed Saving Handbook
Seed Savers (USA)

It’s Corn Season at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market!

Corn is a vegetable and each kernel of corn is a seed. Kernels grow on cobs in cylindrical rows. There are a lot of seeds in each ear too as typically, each ear of sweet corn holds 800 kernels, situated in approximately 15 rows.

Sweet corn was the result of a gene mutation in field corn. This mutation occurred in the 1800s when sugar was prevented from entering the kernel and being converted into starch.

When shopping for corn, etiquette should be observed! One faux pas is pulling back husks if you don’t intend to buy the ear. Look instead for signs of freshness – A light pale green stem with silks & ends just beginning to turn brown. Etiquette aside, the husk protects the kernels, keeping them fresh and moist as corn starts losing sweetness as soon as it’s picked.

So, come out to the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market this Friday, August 24th as we celebrate this vegetable that has been cultivated for a millennia. Visit our ‘Weekly Events’ page for more insight into corn, and some fantastic recipes, too!

To learn more about corn, especially about its rich history, please visit these links:
Native American History of Corn
All about maize
The First People’s Corn
Three Sisters Garden
How and Why to Avoid GMO Corn

You Say Tomato, I Say Tom’ah’to

Almost everyone agrees that fresh tomatoes taste so much better than those bought at the grocery store.
When growing tomatoes isn’t an option, the next best thing is a visit to your local farmers’ market, or more specifically, the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market!

Local tomatoes are good for you! Locally grown tomatoes are in most cases bred for taste & nutritional value, unlike supermarket varieties that are bred for travel. Typically, grocery store tomatoes travel 500-2000 km’s. This means durability becomes the priority and flavour as well as nutrient value end up taking a back seat.

Tomato Tip
Don’t put those tomatoes in the refrigerator. That will ruin their flavour!
Tomatoes will store at room temperature for about a week.

Create some sauces, purees and salsa with your tomatoes and put them in the freezer.
It’s such a great way to enjoy them all year round!
Cheesy Baked Tomato
Provencal Tomatoes
Creamy tomato soup, Panera style
Check out our ‘Weekly Events‘ page for more about the Tomato, and for some more recipes, too!

So, whether you say ‘tomato’ or ‘tom(ah)to, the botanical name is Lycopersicon esculentum, and really, what’s in a name? We should just keep on experimenting and enjoying this popular, versatile food that just tastes so darned good no matter how you say it!
_____________________________________________________________________________________
And, not only do we celebrate tomatoes on Friday, but we also welcome local artisan Karly Cox of Ironclad Metal Works. Her studio is located on Kushog Lake Road, not far from the market. We also have 2 jewelers and a soap/candle maker, so why not join us at the Haliburton County Farmers’ Market this Friday, August 17th where we celebrate the one and only tomato and our local artisans!
We hope to see you there!